Crop at Sarah Myerscough Gallery

Happy new year! My first exhibition visit this year was CROP at the Sarah Myerscough Gallery in south London – a great start.

The exhibition focuses on artists who work with natural materials and traditional craft skills, combined with concern for the environment.

I was initially attracted by the inclusion of work by Tim Johnson, whose exhibition Lines and Fragments I have previously reviewed. More of his fabulous Keeping Time vessels were on show here.

keeping time by tim johnson keeping time by tim johnson

There were other familiar names too. Laura Ellen Bacon’s buff willow bench took pride of place in the window.

muscle memory by laura ellen bacon

Diana Scherer grows textiles from plant roots – her work was featured in the V&A’s Fashioned from Nature exhibition a couple of years ago.

interwoven no 4 by diana scherer

Of the artists that were new to me,  Naoko Serino stood out for her ethereal felted jute sculptures.

rooted by naoko sorinodetail of rooted by naoko sorinoomoi by naoko sorino detail of omoi by naoko sorino

Soojin Kang uses jute too, along with silk and linen, in her wrapped, bound and knotted work.

Pod by soojin kanguntitled by soojin kang

I also loved Caroline Sharp’s delicate pods  made from willow and birch retaining the catkins.

seed capsule by caroline sharp

Not technically part of the exhibition but certainly worth a look are a couple of ceramic vessels by Luke Fuller, who makes layered moulds which burn away during firing, leaving textured pieces reminiscent of rock fractures and geological faults.

luke fuller

CROP runs at the Sarah Myerscough Gallery, The Old Boathouse, 1 White Hart Lane, London SW13 0PX until 31 January 2020.

Published by

Flextiles

Flextiles uses shibori, ecoprinting and felting to create original, one-off upcycled pieces. Extending the life of a garment by an extra nine months reduces its environmental impact by 20-30%.

6 thoughts on “Crop at Sarah Myerscough Gallery”

  1. Thank you for allowing me to see a glimpse of this marvelous exhibition – love the works, especially Tim Johnson’s vessels and the delicate felted jute of Naoko Serino. 🙂

  2. Thank you for sharing this. I can’t get to this kind of exhibition but your reviews are the next best thing!

Leave a Reply to ruthlane Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.