Tiny open weave twined baskets

As a break from precise geometric work, I was aching to have a go at something a little less rigid. Then I saw that Christi York, whom I follow on Instagram, had produced some videos on making open weave baskets.

Her baskets were made from peeled, split ivy (she’s also produced videos showing how to do this). However, I had a go at this but totally failed to split the ivy evenly. (I’ve had similar problems with trying to split willow.)

So I thought I would use some cane leftover from making my cane platter. I’m afraid I didn’t take any photos as I went along not enough hands! 😉  Here’s the result – it’s about 10cm (4 inches) high.

cane garlic basket cane garlic basket

I decided to add a handle on one side so it could be hung up – maybe for keys or a couple of bulbs of garlic.

cane garlic basket

As Christi says in the videos, cane is very regular, which makes it easy to use. So I decided to make another one with more irregular material – cordyalis cordyline leaves.

cordyalis leaves

I have a cordyalis cordyline plant in the back garden – I’m not sure where it came from, as it wasn’t there when we moved in and I’m pretty sure I didn’t plant it! But its leaves are very strong for basketry. They fall off naturally, but sometimes I remove them from the trunk when they have gone brown. I soak them for about an hour in warm water and then wrap them in a towel to mellow overnight.

Here’s the cordyalis cordyline version.

cordyalis garlic basket cordyalis garlic basket

This is even smaller than the cane basket – about 7cm (3 inches) high and 6cm (2.5 inches) across. I used the same number of stakes (9) for each.

Here you can see them together.

two garlic baskets

It was very relaxing to make something more freeform – it was also relatively quick!

Edited to say: Got the name of the plant wrong – should be cordyline, not cordyalis. Goodness knows where that even came from!

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Flextiles

Flextiles uses shibori, ecoprinting and felting to create original, one-off upcycled pieces. Extending the life of a garment by an extra nine months reduces its environmental impact by 20-30%.

10 thoughts on “Tiny open weave twined baskets”

  1. I really like the cordyalis version, seems more authentic somehow, although if it’s that small, I wonder what you could put in it??

  2. I’m sure you really enjoyed making these Kim.
    I too like the more rustic ‘cordyline’ (looking at the leaves I think this is the plant) basket And it would be perfect for One of my small bunchEs of dried lavender.
    (I have a msg for you on Latest TFFS post)

  3. Love the baskets – I can imagine a wall with lots of them hanging together. The texture and colour of the cordyline basket really appeals to me.

      1. Maybe you’ll have to go scouting for cordylines in nearby gardens! We have a cordyline here that I only recently stripped the old leaves from – now I think they could have been fun to experiment with. (But I’m wary of the leaf tips – it managed to cut my eye slightly once – and I wear glasses! Fortunately my eye healed OK.)

  4. These tiny baskets are great. I will join the crowd and agree that the more rustic basket is my favorite. I also agree that a wall of these baskets in various sizes would be wonderful.

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