Knitting Yarns

knitting yarnsAnother book that I got for Christmas was Knitting Yarns edited by Ann Hood, given by my friend Anne, who is a voracious reader. (Last year she set a resolution not to buy any new books – unless it was to read for her book group – and instead to read books that she already had but had never read. That took more self discipline than I could muster – she blogged about the experience under the delightful title Mrs Dalloway is in the Cludgie.)

But I digress. Knitting Yarns is a collection of essays by different writers that celebrate knitting and knitters. There are stories about learning to knit, knitting as therapy, the memories evoked by knitting and the role it plays in relationships. There are even a few knitting patterns, though sadly no photos.

I haven’t read the whole volume yet – I just dip in as the mood takes me. But I was delighted to find a piece by Barbara Kingsolver, whose book The Poisonwood Bible is one of my all-time favourites. (And Anne says that her new book Flight Behaviour is the best thing she read last year.)

Barbara wrote a piece called “Where to Begin”, about shearing a sheep and the transformation process of turning the fleece into yarn. I was reminded of it by a comment on yesterday’s post by Avril of Stitch in Science, wishing that a photo could convey the feel of an object.

Here’s an extract from “Where to Begin”:

“It starts with a texture. There are nowhere near enough words for this, but fingers can sing whole arpeggios at a touch. Textures have their family trees: cloud and thistledown are cousin to catpelt and earlobe and infantscalp. Petal is also a texture, and lime peel and nickelback and nettle and five o’clock shadow and sandstone and ash and soap and slither. Drape is the child of loft and crimp; wool is a stalwart crone who remembers everything, while emptyhead white-haired cotton forgets. And in spite of their various natures, all these strings can be lured to sit down together and play a fiber concerto whole in the cloth. The virgin fleece of an April lamb can be blended and spun with the fleece of a fat blue hare or a twist of flax, anything, you name it, silkworm floss or twiny bamboo. Creatures never known to converse in nature can be introduced and then married right on the spot. The spindle is your altar, you are the matchmaker, steady on the treadle, fingers plying the helices of a beast and its unlikely kin, animal and vegetable, devising your new and surprisingly peaceable kingdoms. Fingers can coax and read and speak, they have their own secret libraries, and illicit affairs, and conventions. Twined into the wool of a hearty ewe on shearing day, hands can read the history of her winter: how many snows, how barren or sweet her manger. For best results, stand in the pasture and throw your arms around her.”

Isn’t that fab? I’m off to the felting table to generate an illicit affair between some merino tops. 😉

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Chelsea degree show 2013

It’s time for the summer degree shows again, but I’ve been so busy I only made it to Chelsea this year. Still, it was well worth it – here are my personal favourites from the 60 or so students who were exhibiting.

I loved Rhona Dalling‘s small 3D sculptures that explored stretching materials to produce forms inspired by the textures and structures of fruit, vegetables and flowers.

rhona dalling

Emi Fujisawa experimented with weaving using natural dyed silk and copper wire that she then patinated – so the piece will change with colour over time. Great website too, showing how her ideas developed.

emi fujisawa

lyonard

Still on constructed textiles. I loved the origami pleating in Lyonard‘s knitted garments, made from mulberry silk,, linen and mercerised cotton (right).

And Kamilah Rebecca Ahmed pioneered an innovative thread “wrapping” technique, to produce fabrics that resembled airy weavings, although the threads don’t actually interlock. She admits that it’s not terribly practical for everyday garments, but the effect is beautiful. Sorry – no photos, as she doesn’t have a website or blog.

And Katherine Ingram‘s “mutant” forms, inspired by David Attenborough’s latest TV series, incorporated shibori-like textures and prints along with 3D textures from found objects. Again – no pictures and no website.

Lots of digital printing as usual – but fewer homages to Pater Pilotto/Mary Katrantzou, I’m pleased to say. Stephanie Ann Woolven created delicate flower print bridal dresses, some of which were based on India Flint’s hapa zome technique of beating flowers on fabric to release their colour. No website or photos I’m afraid.

Finally, some honourable mentions to Sophie Louise Hurley-Walker for her contemporary batik, Caroline Cox for her trendy wet weather gear, and Ann-Marie Milward for her prints  of geometric cymatic patterns (patterns formed by particles such as sand in response to sound waves). See the video below for an example of this working in action – fascinating!

The Chelsea College of Art & Design Undergraduate Summer Show runs until 22 June.

Chelsea degree show 2012

Lots of digital prints seemingly influenced by Peter Pilotto and Mary Katrantzou this year, though maybe that isn’t surprising, given how fashionable they are. I liked  Weiyi Liu’s prints, influenced by African textures and colours, shown with matching ceramic pieces.

Prints by Weiyi Liu

Sofia Drescher‘s shirts, scarves and jacket linings reminded me of looking at tissue samples under a microscope – there was something very cellular about them.

Shirt by Sofia Drescher

The highlight for me was one of the weavers. Katriona McKinnia’s pieces combined super-chunky wools and fine yarns in wonderfully textured and patterned pieces. Even better, her beautifully presented sketchbook contained samples and explained the thinking behind her work.

Weaving (close up) by Katriona McKinnia

Kirsty Jean Leadbetter’s upholstered chair was another fine example of weaving, in shades of earthy green and yellow.

Upholstery by Kirsty Jean Leadbetter (image courtesy of Kirsty Jean Leadbetter)

Kamonchanok Pookayaporn’s laser-cut garments reminded me of the work we did with paper cuts, and her use of puff binder to create  a textured dress was interesting.

Laser-cut dress by Kamonchanok Pookayaporn (image by Oing)

Kate Lawson‘s geometric dresses, inspired by reflections and patterns from London buildings, were also fascinating.

Dress by Kate Lawson

Cara Piazza showed a selection of pieces all dyed with organic matter sourced and foraged in London, including squid ink, onion skins, red wine, strawberries and blackberries.

Cara Piazza Graduate Collection from Cara Marie on Vimeo.

Finally, a couple of garments by Chloe Phelps appealed to me because she used itajime shibori techniques to dye knitted trousers and felt skirts.

Shibori knitted trousers by Chloe Phelps

The Chelsea College of Art and Design BA Show runs until Saturday 23 June.

Spontaneous scarf

This is hardly the weather to be thinking about scarves (hurrah!), but as I’ve suddenly acquired a large stash of odd balls of wool from a friend, I thought it was worth trying out this pattern for a spontaneous scarf by Charlene Anderson.

The scarf is knitted lengthwise, changing the yarn every row and leaving a length of 7-8 inches of wool at each end that later forms the fringe. By using moss stitch (that’s British moss stitch, not American moss stitch*), you achieve an almost woven effect.

It’s so effective but so simple – certainly simple enough for me to be able to watch Scandinavian thrillers with subtitles without any problem while knitting! And because you change yarn every row, it’s great for using up leftover balls.

*Another example of two nations divided by a single language. In British moss stitch you knit one, purl one across the row, and then on the second row you purl the knit stitches and knit the purl stitches. Americans call this seed stitch. American moss stitch is alternating knit and purl across two rows, followed by two rows of alternating purl and knit.

3D nuno felting

I’m currently working on a series of spherical felt samples, experimenting with different techniques to introduce additional texture to the form.

I started with straightforward nuno, enclosing the plastic resist with silk cut from an old scarf,  felting over it, cutting it open and turning it inside out:

I also tried knitting with strips of silk scarf knotted together and then felting it – on a flat piece this time.  I put some wisps of wool over part of the knitting to help it felt in, but it didn’t really need it. The silk knitting felted in very well, but I think the stitches needed to be more open to get the contrast between the felt and the silk:

So then I used crochet – first with 100% wool (Rowan Felted Tweed) and then with a mystery yarn donated by a friend. I suspect it’s synthetic, because it’s quite shiny, but I thought I’d still give it a go, because the contrast in texture would be very interesting.

The wool version did felt in, though it also went quite hairy. The other version didn’t felt in, but seems quite happy sitting on top of the felt. I may try stitching on top just to catch it in and make sure it stays in place.

I’ve got some lambswool yarn that is used at Morley for machine knitting – I’m going to try using that to see if I get a less hairy finish.

Felted entrelac

I’ve been doing quite a lot of knitting over the holidays, probably as a change from all the felting and embroidery I did before Christmas. But I don’t have the patience for big projects like sweaters any more, so I’ve been looking out for quick items that are still challenging or unusual, like the pinwheel purse.

So when I came across these felted entrelac fobs, I had to have a go. Not just because I’d never knitted entrelac (a stitch that looks like basket weave), but also because I could felt it afterwards.

The knitting instructions looked complicated but were actually fairly straightforward. The biggest problem I had was finding a set of five 6.5mm double-pointed needles – in the end I used four double-pointed needles and one circular one.

To felt, I put it inside a pillow case and washed it with a load of bedding at 60°C. Although it felted slightly, it wasn’t enough for my taste:

So I tried again, this time putting it in the machine with a large bath towel, without the pillow case, at 60°C. Much better result:

And here it is with the cord, made from twisted wool  (I haven’t got hold of a key fob attachment yet). I think I might try felting the cord at some stage as well.

Knitted pinwheel purse

As a break last night from sewing up purses/spectacle cases/Oystercard holders/smartphone cases, I picked up my (dusty) knitting needles and made this cute pinwheel purse from Frankie Brown.

It’s very simple and very clever – the secret is in the blocking (wetting it and pinning it out to dry). It would be a perfect wrapping for a pair of earrings or for keeping a few buttons or beads in.

 

Origin

I was lucky enough to win a ticket, courtesy of Liberty, to the private view last night of Origin, the contemporary craft fair organised by the Crafts Council. It was a wonderful collection of 200 makers from every discipline – and a glass of something bubbly and delicious canapés helped things along!

There did seem to be an awful lot of jewellery (I’m not really a jewellery person, much to ESP’s relief!), but naturally I was mostly drawn to the textiles, though there were some fascinating lighting displays as well. Favourites below.

I’ve mentioned Michelle Griffiths before, so it was great to meet her in person. Her pure, pollen-inspired forms are rooted in shibori techniques of stitching and pleating, but she does use dye as well. She showed me a beautiful indigo shibori piece with a pattern based on a spectogram of a blackbird’s song. And she also makes lovely heat-set “bubble wrap”.

More shibori – Anne Selby makes the most amazing sculptural pleated scarves using the arashi shibori method. This is not just pleating – it’s double pleating and layering, steaming, discharging and redyeing that produces such exquisite pieces.

Johannes Hemann, storm series from Victor Hunt on Vimeo.

And now for something completely different. Johannes Hermann‘s “Storm Series” consists of lamp shades and other objects that look like organic crystal growths. He makes them by using a fan to blow granules of styrofoam or other light plastic around a heated box. The combination of heat and wind causes the granules to clump together. Fascinating!

I guess you could call Jasmin Giles‘ work jewellery, but it’s more like wearable art. She combines knitting with glass, wax and resin to create bold statement pieces. Not something you’d probably wear to the office, but certainly wonderfully eye catching.

Joanne Bowles works in metal and ceramics – her work has a very Japanese feel. I love the contrast between the linear ridges of the metal basket and the smooth translucence of the bowl.

Gill Wilson works with paper, forming pulp into large-scale multi-layered geometric structures encased in clear perspex cases. Like Michelle Griffiths, she has trained in Japan, and some of that aesthetic purity comes through here.

Rachel Gornall combines layers, colour and stitch to produce textile artworks that remind me of stained glass windows – beautiful!

Finally, Claudia Phipps works in real glass. She was exhibiting glass wings, based on patterns from dragonflies and lacewings, cutting the holes using waterjets. It’s inspired me to think about felting a scarf in a similar shape.

Origin is on from 22 to 28 September, at Old Spitalfields Market, London E1 6EW, 11am-7pm. Admission £10.